Observing Harry: Child Development and Learning 0-5

By Cath Arnold | Go to book overview

2 Observing Harry and using
theory to understand
Harry's development and
learning

We observe Harry to understand what he is learning. Like Susan Isaacs in the 1920s, we make narrative observations. These tell the story of Harry's actions and language without any judgements being made about his intentions at first. This sort of observation is descriptive, looks at the whole child and does not have pre-determined outcomes. Piaget (1962) made many narrative observations of his own three children and of children in the 'Maison des Petits'. Here is an example:

At 5;2 V. amused himself by jumping up and down on the
stairs. At first he carried out his movements aimlessly, but
later he tried to jump from the ground on to a seat, increas-
ing the distance he jumped each time. K. (5;6) then did the
same, but from the other side. They were eventually jumping
at opposite ends, running along the bench to meet each
other, one being pushed backwards by the collision.

(Piaget 1962: 117)

Note that Piaget states the age of each child and that he judges V's actions to be 'aimless' at first but then observes that V and K set themselves targets. We can see immediately that these two children are amused and motivated to act. We can easily make links with their physical, mathematical and personal and social development. The observation is in sufficient detail for us to know what is happening at the time the children are observed. To make sense of our observations, we need to look at theories about how children learn and how adults can help them.

This chapter is divided into three sections:

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Observing Harry: Child Development and Learning 0-5
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 161

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.