ICT in the Primary School

By Avril Loveless; Babs Dore | Go to book overview

4
FROM WEAK SIGNALS TO
THE CONCEPT OF
mLEARNING: THE LIVE
PROJECT REVISITED

Janne Sariola

Aamo Rönkä,

Seppo Telia

Heikki Kynäslahti

The experiences described and discussed in this chapter reflect many aspects of the work of Janne Sariola and his colleagues in the University of Helsinki, Finland. They discuss a Finnish research and development project which anticipated the current emergence of mobile learning. In this project, called LIVE, pupils, teachers and student teachers used mobile telephony in an experiential and collaborative manner, working in direct contact with the surrounding community and with people in other parts of the country. They describe the everyday educational activities and elaborate on the concept of 'mLeaming'.

They argue that the project helped to combine pedagogical innovation and technological innovation which, in turn, contributed to the emergence of social innovation. Their starting point is the notion of weak signals.


Introduction: the weak signals of mLearning

Weak signals is a notion that was originally used in radio astronomy to provide visual evidence of barely noticeable signals over a fairly large frequency range. Lately, however, it has been used to refer to weak signs that are around us and that later are likely to become important trends or phenomena. The majority of people usually do not notice these signals,

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