Investigating Gender: Contemporary Perspectives in Education

By Becky Francis; Christine Skelton | Go to book overview

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES IN SCHOOLS?
Kate Myers (ed.)

Whatever Happened to Equal Opportunities in Schools?is an edited book which
makes an important contribution to the current debate about equal opportu-
nities. Today the dominant concern is about boys' achievement but it was
not always thus. Contributors trace events relating to schools since the intro-
duction of the Sex Discrimination Act and the establishment of the Equal
Opportunities Commission in the mid-1970s. Prior to the advent of the
National Curriculum it was common practice for boys and girls to take different
subjects and be offered very different opportunities and experience through
the overt and covert school curriculum. Initiatives emerging from central
government, quangos, trade unions, local education authorities, and indi-
vidual schools are described. The book discusses: how much has really changed;
the extent to which credit should be given to earlier initiatives concerned with
the raising of girls' aspirations and achievement; what we can learn from these
initiatives; and what we should really be concerned about now. The book also
addresses the question of boys' achievement both past and present and will
be important reading for all educators with an interest in promoting gender
equality in schools.


Contents

How did we get here? – Part I Country-wide initiatives – Prudence and progress:
national policy for equal opportunities (gender) in schools since 1975 – Challenging
inequalities in the classroom: the role and contribution of the Equal Opportunities Com-
mission – Equal to the task? The role of the NUT in promoting equal opportunities in
schools – Part II Local education authorities – An episode in the thirty years war: race,
sex and class in the ILEA 1981–90 – Now you see it, now you don't: gender equality
work in Brent 1982–8 – Did it make a difference? The Ealing experience 1987–9 –
Part III Projects – Was there really a problem? The Schools Council Sex Differentiation
Project 1981–3 – Has the mountain moved? The Girls Into Science and Technology
Project 1979–83 – Working with boys at Hackney Downs School 1980–4 – Teachers.
Femocrats and academics: activism in London in the 1980s – Part IV Whatever
happened to … – A black perspective – When Ms Muffet fought back: a view of
work on children's books since the 1970s – Part V Conclusion – Lessons learned? –
Index.

256pp 0 335 20303 5 (Paperback) 0 335 20304 3 (Hardback)

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Investigating Gender: Contemporary Perspectives in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 225

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.