GLOSSARY

Associative sponsorship: the standard form of sponsorship, especially in the arts, where the sponsor is not supposed to influence content and programming. See deep sponsorship.

Branding: the marketing process whereby the social and cultural value of a product is enhanced by the name and logo of a company, such as Nike and the swoosh, which also involves the self-branding of the consumer as a distinction strategy.

Capitalism: an economic system based on exploitation of labour that produces great wealth, inequality and environmental damage.

Circuit of culture: cultural products pass through a cycle of interacting moments: production, representation, consumption, identity and regulation.

Citizenship: the rights and obligations of membership in a political community; and, by extension, social and cultural rights and obligations.

Commodification: the process whereby any product or service becomes the object of monetary transaction, including products and services that would otherwise be exchanged freely such as songs and childcare.

Commodity fetishism: when a product takes on a magical quality unrelated to its actual use, such as the devotion to branded commodities.

Consumerism: an ideology that enshrines commodity consumption as the meaning of life.

Consumption: the reception and use of products and services.

Cool: originally an alternative cultural stance to the mainstream, associated with Black American music (especially jazz) and style in the 1950s; now a word used widely by young people to mean little more than 'good' in a fashionable sense.

Criticism: various meanings but particularly in this book calling into question, from a perspective of emancipation, that which is taken for granted from the point of view of official discourse; in short, asking awkward questions.

Critique of mass culture: an intellectual tradition that is disdainful of mass-produced culture and popular taste. See cultural elitism and dumbing down.

Cultural capitalism: refers to the claim that the production and circulation of cultural goods and services are at the heart of latter-day capitalism.

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Rethinking Cultural Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Issues in Cultural and Media Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor's Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 7
  • 2: Discourses of Cultural Policy 33
  • 3: Cultural Policy Proper and as Display 61
  • 4: Rhetorics of Development, Diversity and Tourism 92
  • 5: Cul Ture, Capitalism and Critique 113
  • Glossary 143
  • References 149
  • Index 165
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