A Confederate Chronicle: The Life of a Civil War Survivor

By Pamela Chase Hain | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to my great aunt, Pamela McDowall Wragg, daughter of Dr. Thomas L. Wragg, for providing me with information about her father. I visited her in her apartment in the "Louise Home," a residence for Episcopal ladies, in Washington, D.C., when I was seven years old. As I was her namesake, she gave to me her personal Bible, genealogical information on the Wraggs, and a miniature portrait of Thomas Wragg's grandfather, Andrew McDowall, by the artist "Dessy." Since I was a child at the time, I was allowed to keep only the Bible. I am indebted to my grandfather, Samuel Alston Wragg, son of Dr. Wragg, for his efforts to write his "autobiography" and provide at least a modicum of information on his father. The Wragg letters and papers, which my Aunt Louise Graves, Samuel Wragg's daughter, kept at her home in Charleston, was eventually given to me, partly in 1969–70 when I lived in Charleston while my husband was in Vietnam, and finally when Louise Graves moved into a nursing home in 1991.

My interest in Dr. Thomas L. Wragg crystallized in the early 1990s when Charles and Dorothy Hatcher came from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to South Carolina to visit Dorothy's mother, Dorothy Wragg McLaurin, daughter of Thomas Wragg, Jr. Over the course of many months, Charles Hatcher and I exchanged information on Dr. Wragg. Charles Hatcher's interest in Thomas Wragg inspired me to write a brief biography of him, which I shared with the Hatchers and my brothers, providing the seed for further research.

I owe a great deal to my mother, Judith Wragg Chase, and father, Lieutenant Colonel Richard Chase, for instilling in me a fascination for history. Over the course of my lifetime, my mother sent me genealogical information on the Wragg and Alston families. In the three years before

-xv-

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