A Confederate Chronicle: The Life of a Civil War Survivor

By Pamela Chase Hain | Go to book overview

Courtship by Correspondence
1866–68

Such is the Nature of Woman. They love to rule but hate to be gov-
erned themselves in turn. What a beautiful night, the full moon looks
down as though it were mocking me for not being with her I love
next my God. Never mind old moon, tomorrow night will be my turn
to laugh. Good night.

Thomas L. Wragg "diary," June 5, 1868

Josie Cooper and Thomas Wragg became engaged in July 1866. By this time, Wragg had abandoned the bookstore and obtained a job as a railroad agent for the "A & A Railroad" (now, Atlantic Coastline Railroad) in Whigham and later at Cairo, Georgia, fourteen miles by rail from Thomasville. This separation resulted in two years of "love" letters between Thomas Wragg and Josie Cooper. These letters provide insight into nineteenth-century mores and courtship practices and Wragg's emotions in the postwar years. He frequently referred to his "peculiar disposition" and the "despondency of my nature." Yet, in spite of his roller-coaster moods, he continued to function and joke, looking to Josie to raise his spirits.

-143-

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