Estonia: Identity and Independence

By Jean-Jacques Subrenat; David Cousins et al. | Go to book overview

Küllo Arjakas


Reflections on the Late 1980s and Early 1990s
An opinion

Today it is impossible to say who of our ancestors was the first to come up with the idea that the peoples living by the shores of the Baltic Sea could also have their own state. However, it should be pointed out that during the years of the Crimean War (1853–1856), at a time when the national awakening movement had not even begun here, the French journalist Louis-Antoine Léouzon Le Duc put such thoughts into print. On a journey to search for porphyry for the tomb of the Emperor Napoleon, he reached the shores of the Baltic where he met peoples which were unfamiliar to him. In 1855,in Paris, he published a book about his travels, called La Baltique. In covering the general political situation on the shores of the Baltic Sea in the chapter headed [Reval,] his flight of thought even reached far enough to write:

… whatever comes to pass, whether the Scandinavian powers will rally to
the cause of the Western powers or not; whether Finland will be handed
over to Sweden or will stay in the hands of Russia; whether Estonia,
Livonia and Courland will recover their ancient national independence or
continue to be slowly absorbed into the vortex of Moscow…

In some respects it is noteworthy that it was a Frenchman who was the one to put clearly into words the historical choice which has confronted the people of this region for centuries. It is undoubtedly important that this was done in a language spoken so widely. It is, of course, quite another matter how much those lines were read at the time or how much the readers could be bothered to think about that far-off place and the complicated dilemma facing a littleknown people.

It is quite certain that the brightest Estonians at that time had not yet thought that far. In Ferdinand Johann Wiedemann's Estonian-German dictionary, which was published in 1869 and contained over 50,000 words, there are no entries for the words iseseisvus (independence) and vabariik (republic). And there is no reason to be surprised at the absence of the latter as, in the understanding of the country people, czarist power was still in force.

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Estonia: Identity and Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.