Boys and Literacy: Practical Strategies for Librarians, Teachers, and Parents

By Elizabeth Knowles; Martha Smith | Go to book overview

3

Information/Nonfiction

Introduction
Boys like books that are crammed with facts, information, illustrations, diagrams, and photographs that further explain the text. They like their facts in small chunks of text, their information well-organized, and an information book with a thorough index. Boys like amazing and unusual facts—things they can share with their peers. Books that tell them how to do things and provide directions for hands-on experiments and projects are at the top of the list. It is very important to survey their interests so that you can provide nonfiction books that they will love.
Discussion Questions
How does the information provided in this book compare to or supplement the information in your classroom text?
What are the most interesting facts you learned in this book?
How is the information organized? Is it easy to locate what you want?
Are there clear headings and subheadings to help you navigate through the information?
Have you read other books on this same topic? If so, how did the other books compare?
If you could talk to the author of this book, what questions would you ask?
Will you look for other books on this topic?

-17-

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Boys and Literacy: Practical Strategies for Librarians, Teachers, and Parents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • What Does the Research Say? xi
  • Strategies for Change xvii
  • 1: Humor 1
  • 2: Adventure 9
  • 3: Information/Nonfiction 17
  • 4: Fantasy/Science Fiction 25
  • 5: Horror/Mystery 35
  • 6: Sports 43
  • 7: War 53
  • 8: Biography 63
  • 9: History 71
  • 10: Graphic Novels 81
  • 11: Realistic Fiction 87
  • Appendix A - Author Information Just for Boys 97
  • Appendix B - Magazine Information 121
  • Works Cited 135
  • Resources 137
  • Author Index 139
  • Title Index 149
  • About the Authors 165
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