A Call to Be Whole: The Fundamentals of Health Care Reform

By Barbara J. Sowada | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It's a pleasure to thank the persons whose help and support made this book possible. I am particularly grateful to two special people whose encouragement focused and sustained me during the seven years I spent refining my thinking and writing: Bernadette Prinster, M.S., Director, Community End of Life Care Network Project, Santa Fe, NM; and Mitch Saunders, President, Action Learning Partners, Felton, Calif.

I also wish to thank Sister Lynn Casey of the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth and former CEO of St. Mary's Hospital & Medical Center, the participants of the Grand Junction Dialogue Project, and the project's facilitators—William N. Isaacs, Mitch Saunders, Barbara Coffman, John Gray, and their support staff.

For the grass root examples, I am grateful to CeCe Huffnagle, R.N., N.P., Woman's Health and Menopause Center, Denver, Colo.; Beth Branthaver, Manager, Chronic Conditions Management Program, Kaiser Permanente of Northern California; John Huddler, Editor, Burlington Record, Burlington, Colo.; James Glaser, Director, Center for Healthcare Reform, St. Joseph Health System, Orange, Calif., a ministry of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Orange; and Janet Cameron, Executive Director, Marillac Clinic, Grand Junction, Colo., a ministry of the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth; and Sylvia McSkimming, Executive Director, Supportive Care of the Dying. To the many people whose personal experience or composite experiences were used to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the current health care system, I also owe a debt of gratitude.

Gratitude is due as well to Foy Ritchie, President, Rocky Mountain Pastoral Care and Training Associates, for the information regarding reconcil

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