Childhood Lost: How American Culture Is Failing Our Kids

By Sharna Olfman | Go to book overview

About the Editor and the
Contributors

Sharna Olfman is a clinical psychologist and an associate professor of developmental psychology at Point Park University, where she is also the founding director of the Childhood and Society Symposium. Olfman is the editor of the Childhood in America book series for Praeger Publishers. She recently published All Work and No Play: How Educational Reforms Are Harming Our Preschoolers. Dr. Olfman is a member of the Council on Human Development and a partner in the Alliance for Childhood. She has written on gender development, women's mental health, infant care, and child psychopathology.

Laura E. Berk received her PhD from the University of Chicago and is a distinguished professor of psychology at Illinois State University. She has published widely in the fields of early childhood development and education, focusing on the effects of school environments on children's development, the social origins and functional significance of children's private speech, and the role of make-believe play in the development of self-regulation. Her books include Private Speech: From Social Interaction to Self-Regulation; Scaffolding Children's Learning: Vygotsky and Early Childhood Education; and Awakening Children's Minds: How Parents and Teachers Can Make a Difference. She has also authored three widely distributed textbooks: Child Development; Infants, Children, and Adolescents; and Development through the Lifespan.

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Childhood Lost: How American Culture Is Failing Our Kids
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - Children's Irreducible Needs 1
  • 1: The Natural History of Children 3
  • 2: Why Parenting Matters 19
  • Part II - How American Culture is Failing Our Kids 55
  • 3: The War Against Parents 57
  • 4: The Impact of Media Violence on Developing Minds and Hearts 89
  • 5: The Commercialization of Childhood 107
  • 6: Big Food, Big Money, Big Children 123
  • 7: So Sexy, So Soon 137
  • 8: Techno-Environmental Assaults on Childhood in America 155
  • 9: [No Child Left] 185
  • 10: Where Do the Children Play? 203
  • Index 217
  • About the Editor and the Contributors 223
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