Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners

By Karen S. Meador | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners is an important and long-awaited book. Fortunately, Karen Meador is the right person to write such a book. She has long been in touch with the creativity of young children and is a scholar of creativity and problem solving. Teachers, parents, and grandparents especially will find this book an exciting adventure.

The author is thoroughly familiar with children's books and their use in learning creativity and problem-solving skills. While she primarily provides examples from trade books, teachers will find that regular school textbooks can be used in the same ways. Reading, history, geography, and other social science books are especially rich in possibilities. Thirty years ago, I served as creativity consultant to a major publisher of reading books. The editors, authors, illustrators, and graphics people became very enthusiastic and produced new products that exceeded my expectations. Not only the stories themselves, but also the illustrations and the print could be used to teach creativity and problem-solving skills.

Let me give an example from the first reader in the series. The book is entitled A Duck Is a Duck and contains a story entitled [What Is It?] It begins with a two-page illustration of four children followed by a dog on their way to school. The children try, to get the dog to go back home, but the dog finds something in the bushes. After some time they discover that it is a turtle and talk about all the things that the turtle can do. After considering the alternatives, they decide to put the turtle in a box and take it to school. The children ask the teacher to guess what is in the box. The teacher asks the children to give her some clues. Finally she guesses correctly, and the children unveil their prize. Then, the problem becomes what to do with the turtle. The teacher has the children brainstorm possible solutions. After doing this, they establish a criterion: what the turtle likes to do. They decide to put the turtle into the pool in the park and proceed to do this; they make sure that the turtle could do all the things turtles like to do.

This story teaches not only the problem-solving process, but also beginning reading skills, such as reading or interpreting the illustrations, and a beginning reading vocabulary of 16 words with practice with additional words they had already mastered. The teacher could extend the [what is it?] lesson by placing some commonplace object in a box and having the children guess its contents. Other creative and problem-solving skills can be taught by turning the reading into a creative drama or role-playing exploration. This makes the reading more realistic and reveals other problems and conflicts.

I would like to say a few words about the consequences of these kinds of learning. On the basis of my experience, I can assure you that, if the lessons are skillfully and enthusiastically done, you can count upon the following outcomes:

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Gifted Treasury Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Fluency 1
  • Chapter 2 - Flexibility 20
  • Chapter 3 - Originality 38
  • Chpater 4 - Elaboration 54
  • Chapter 5 - Problem Solving 69
  • Chapter 6 - Characteristics of Creative People 92
  • Chapter 7 - Synergy 112
  • Chapter 8 - Let's Talk 126
  • Afterword 139
  • References 141
  • Author/Title Index 147
  • Subject Index 151
  • About the Author 157
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 162

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.