Presenting Gender: Changing Sex in Early-Modern Culture

By Chris Mounsey | Go to book overview

The Bucknell Studies in Eighteenth-Century
Literature and Culture
General Editor:Greg Glingham, Bucknell University
Advisory Board:Pual K. Allen, University of Southern California Chloe Chard, Independent Scholar Clement Hawes, The Pennsylvania State University Robert Markley, University of West Virginia Jessica Munns, University of Denver Cedric D. Reverand II, University of Wyoming Janet Todd, University of Glasgow

The Bucknell Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture aims to publish challenging, new eighteenth-century scholarship. Of particular interest is critical, historical, and interdisciplinary work that is interestingly and intelligently theorized, and that broadens and refines the conception of the field. At the same time, the series remains open to all theoretical perspectives and different kinds of scholarship. While the focus of the series is the literature, history, arts, and culture (including art, architecture, music, travel, and history of science, medicine, and law) of the long eighteenth century in Britain and Europe, the series is also interested in scholarship that establishes relationships with other geographies, literatures, and cultures of the period 1660–1830.


Titles in This Series

Tanya Caldwell, Time to Begin Anew: Dryden's Georgics and Aeneis
Mita Choudhury, Interculturalism and Resistance in the London Theatre,
1660–1800: Identity, Performance, Empire

James Cruise, Governing Consumption: Needs and Wants, Suspended
Characters, and the "Origins" of Eighteenth-Century English Novels
Edward Jacobs, Accidental Migrations: An Archaeology of Gothic Discourse
Regina Hewitt and Pat Rogers, eds., Orthodoxy and Heresy in Eighteenth-
Century Studies

Chris Mounsey, Christopher Smart: Clown of God
Chris Mounsey, ed., Presenting Gender
Laura Rosenthal and Mita Choudhury, eds., Monstrous Dreams of Reason
Philip Smallwood, ed., Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After
http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/univ press

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