Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

7
THE ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE

Because of globalization many people in the world now live longer than
before and their standard of living is far better. …Globalization has reduced
the sense of isolation felt in much of the developing world and has given
many people in the developing countries access to knowledge well beyond
the reach of even the wealthiest in any country a century ago.1

What many people have come to understand by globalization is a "combination of rapid technological progress, large-scale capital flows, and burgeoning international trade," a purely economic phenomenon.2 Regardless of the indicators used, international economic activity—trade, foreign direct investment, and portfolio investment—has grown at increasing rates over the last several generations. In parallel with expanding economic liberalization and trade flows, the responses of states and societies to economic integration seem to have inspired their success or failure as relevant political and social units. Economic globalists see "the embrace of globalization as the only route to economic growth. … The Internet is the agent that renders inevitable a transparent, democratic, decentralized, and market-based society."3

Within the economic perspective, the result of globalization would be an integrated, global economy in which neither distance nor time nor political borders would impede economic transactions in goods and services. The costs of transport and communication would be zero, and the barriers between national political jurisdictions would have vanished.4 It is, however, too much to "conclude from the steep growth curves on international economic flows and policy liberalization that a truly seamless worldwide market is emerging. … Factors such as country size and proximity to neighbors (which have nothing to do with level of development) have marked bearing on trade volumes. … "Econometric analysis" suggests that the policies governments pursued with respect to openness or closure to trade and international capital were essentially uncorrelated with international economic flows." Although

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Knowledge, Perspectives, and People 1
  • 2: Knowledge and Knowledge Creation 13
  • 3: The Power Ofperspective 33
  • 4: The Idea of Progress 81
  • 5: The Political Perspective 113
  • 6: Cultural Globalization 173
  • 7: The Economic Perspective 219
  • 8: The Double Movement 253
  • 9: The Global Perspective 303
  • Selected Bibliography 339
  • Author Index 371
  • Subject Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.