Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1520-1550: A Documented Chronology

By Blanche Gangwere | Go to book overview

Notation

A. Part Arrangement

1. Partbooks were the usual format from the beginning of the sixteenth century

a) This was true in both manuscript and print

b) They were separately bound manuscripts, or printed books, containing the music for a single voice or instrument in an ensemble RanH, 609

(1) The number of partbooks in a set corresponded to the number of parts of an individual work

(2) Each partbook was named for the voice or part contained

(3) In part-arrangement notation bar lines were used to mark off main sections of a piece RasN, 113

c) The earliest surviving set of partbooks is in manuscript RanH, 609

(1) It is the GlogauerLiederbuch of ca. 1480, see GanMR, 165

d) "Printed sets begin with Ottaviano Petrucci's Motetti C of 1504 RanH, 60


B. Score Arrangement

1. Definition ApeN, xx

a) "The voices of a composition are written one underneath the other, arranged in such a way that simultaneous tones appear in a vertical or nearly vertical alignment"

(1) This notation is historically the earliest method of writing used for polyphonic music

(a) "The practice of superimposing one voice of a polyphonic composition above the other and aligning the voices in time (even if only roughly) reaches back to the earliest notation of polyphony and extends through the late-twelfth-century organa of Leonin and Perotin" AtlR 417

(b) It was employed in the sources for the polyphonic repertories of Notre Dame and St. Martial RanH, 736

i) It was used especially for the conductus

(2) But score notation fell into disuse during the thirteenth century AtlR, 417

(a) This was the result of the development of the motet which gave

-184-

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Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1520-1550: A Documented Chronology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Music Reference Collection ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Reference Material xi
  • Bibliography 1
  • Part II: Historical Outline and Study Guide 122
  • Theorists and Theoretical Sources 123
  • Musica Theorica: Science of Music 137
  • Musica Practica: Performance Didactics 154
  • Musica Poëtica: Composition 177
  • Notation 184
  • Sacred Latin Music for the Catholic Church on the Continent 199
  • Sacred Music for the Reformed Church on the Continent 256
  • Sacred Latin and Vernacular Music in England 295
  • Secular Vocal Music 366
  • Instrumental Music 455
  • Index of Persons 507
  • Index of Works 511
  • Subject Index 527
  • About the Author 537
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