Teaching to Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process

By Marcia B. Baxter Magolda | Go to book overview
Save to active project

How African American and white students and faculty
develop a strong identity and healthy interpersonal
relationships is explored. Faculty are encouraged to
engage students in dialogue about multicultural issues
and adapt their teaching practices to create a culturally
responsive learning environment for students and faculty.


5
Creating a Culturally Responsive
Learning Environment for
African American Students

Mary F. Howard-Hamilton

“All students, including those from traditional White, middle class backgrounds, have a right to expect that their courses present comprehensive knowledge and prepare them to succeed in a multicultural community. Understanding the perspectives of many groups enriches the lives of all students, and promotes a more equitable society for all” (Kitano, 1997a, p. 4).

Faculty members have the power to make the learning environment for all students inclusive and supportive rather than isolating and exclusionary. This can be done successfully by creating a culturally responsive curriculum in which the life experiences of diverse groups will not be expunged from the course content. Students’ ability to understand multiple perspectives is mediated by, among other factors, their own racial identity development. Theories of racial identity development, for both people of color and whites, can help us understand this important dimension of preparing all students to succeed in a multicultural society.

Racial identity theories have been developed to understand how white people and individuals from visible racial ethnic groups identify with their racial cohorts (Carter, 1995). As children grow and develop in this society, they become aware that they belong to a specific racial group. According to Carter, “the challenge for each individual is to incorporate race into his or her personal identity” (p. 82). Specifically, an individual’s identity and personality is complex and dynamic, made up of immutable characteristics, unusual experiences, and personal challenges and choices. Personalities and identities are also products of societal influences such as the family, the

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching to Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 104

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?