Teaching to Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process

By Marcia B. Baxter Magolda | Go to book overview

INDEX
Ability: blending of racial identity and, 55–65; concealing of, in high-ability black collegians, 57–58; level of meaning-making versus, 10–11; need to prove, in high-ability black collegians, 58–59
Academic concentration, choice of, 29–30
Acculturation, 70; in college, 70–72; dimensions of, 70; levels of, 70
“Acting white,” 57
Active learning methods, 77, 97
Adversarial reasoning, 30–31
Affective or spiritual acculturation, 70
Affirmation, 13–14, 97
African American history and culture, learning about, 47–48, 70, 71–72
African American students, 45–54; culturally responsive learning environments for, 45, 50–52; faculty interaction with, 62–63, 64; high-ability, 55–65; like-type learning communities for, 64, 96–97; literature review of, 55; peer support for, 57, 59–62, 64, 93, 96–97; racial identity theories and, 45–49, 71–72. See also High-ability black collegians
Alienation, detachment and, 27–28
Allen, W. R., 55, 62, 65
American culture and worldview, 74
Aristotelian view of governance, 37
Asian Americans, 70
Assessment: blind grading for, 31; of class, 52; of connected knowing, 34; of meaning-making order, 11–12; of separate knowing, 34; of students’ meaning-making, 93–94; to support holistic development, 96
Assimilated level of acculturation, 70
Association of American Colleges, 23, 25
Atkinson, D. R., 70, 78
Authorities, 28–29
Authority figures, high-ability black collegians and, 57–58
Autonomy status, 49, 50
Awareness stage of racial identity, 47
Banking education, 46, 51
Base groups, 77
Baxter Magolda, M. B., 1–3, 7, 10, 14, 23, 24, 25, 41, 44, 74, 78, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 95, 96, 98
Behavioral acculturation, 70
Belenky, M. F., 28, 34
Beliefs, justification of. See Justification of beliefs
Believing game, 31–32
Bellah, R. N., 38, 44
Benson, L., 38, 44
Berryhill-Paapke, E., 70, 78
Bicultural level of acculturation, 70
Billson, J. M., 82, 85, 87
Bisexual students. See Gay, lesbian, and bisexual students
Bleich, D., 31, 34
Blind grading, 31
Blumer, H., 40, 44
Brett, B., 29, 35
Bruffee, K. A., 98
Campus barriers to African American students, 56
Caring education, 99
Caring self, 37–44; defined, 37; democracy and, 38–39; in example, 92, 93; rationale and need for, 41–42; service learning for development of, 41–44, 95; social self and, 39–40
Casas, J. M., 70, 78
Case study analyses and discussions, 51, 77
Centralization of classroom, 86, 95
Certainty of knowledge: in prereflective thinking, 17, 20; in quasi-reflective thinking, 17, 20; in Reflective Judgment Model stages, summarized, 20–21; in reflective thinking, 18, 21, 22
Choney, S. K., 70, 78
Church, C. A., 85, 87
Classroom: addressing sexual orientation in, 85–87; centralization of, 86, 95; communitybuilding in, 76–77; creating inclusive and effective, 94–97; developing intercultural competence in, 76–78; expressing cultural identity in, 67–79; gay, lesbian, and bisexual students in, continuum of experience in, 85–86; marginalization in, 85–86, 96. See also Learning environments
Clinchy, B. M., 2–3, 27, 28, 33, 34, 35, 89, 91, 93, 95, 96, 97
Co-construction of meaning. See Order 3 of meaning-making
Cognition, 1, 16. See also Epistemological dimension
Cognitive acculturation, 70
Cognitive development, worldviews and, 74. See also Epistemological dimension
Collaborative learning methods, 77, 96, 98
Coming out, 83–84, 92
Communities of learners, 96–97
Community: building, in the classroom, 76–77, 96–97; democracy and, 38–39; gay, lesbian, and bisexual, 84–85
Community service learning. See Service learning
Complex stage model, 19
Conformity stage of racial identity, 47
Connected education, 33–34
Connected knowing, 27–35; assessment of, 34; constructed knowing and, 32–33, 91–92; defined, 31–32; detachment versus, 27–28, 32, 34; separate knowing and, 32–33, 91, 93
Connolly, M., 85, 87
Constructed knowing, 32–33, 91–92. See also Connected knowing; Meaning-making

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