Understanding Attachment and Attachment Disorders: Theory, Evidence, and Practice

By Vivien Prior; Danya Glaser | Go to book overview

14 The Nature of
Attachment Disorder

There continues to be some lack of clarity about the nature of attachment disorders. One aspect about which there is consensus is that, whatever the precise nature of these difficulties, they only arise following very adverse early caregiving experiences in the child's life, to the extent that one might conceptualise the disorders as 'post severe caregiving adversity disorders'. This is, however, unsatisfactory, as a disorder cannot be characterised by its antecedents alone.


No discriminated attachment figure

The adverse early caregiving environment is most probably one of severe neglect characterised by lack of a consistent and available caregiver. However, the term maltreatment has also been used to describe the affected children's early experiences (e.g. Boris et al. 2004) and, indeed, ICD-10 (but not DSM-IV-TR) includes psychological and physical abuse and injury as well as neglect. This is problematic since maltreatment includes both neglect (omission) and abuse (commission). As will be discussed below, the postulated explanation for how attachment disorders evolve is based on an absence of an available or responsive caregiver to whom to attach. While abuse can occur alongside serious neglect or changes of caregiver, abuse on its own would be insufficient to explain attachment disorder. Abuse is associated with a developed, albeit disorganised, attachment. It is therefore safer to assume that it is absence-omission which is implicated as the pre-condition for attachment disorders. This can occur in three caregiving contexts: (1) (some) institutions, (2) repeated changes of primary caregiver and (3) extremely neglectful identifiable primary

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Attachment and Attachment Disorders: Theory, Evidence, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.