Understanding Attachment and Attachment Disorders: Theory, Evidence, and Practice

By Vivien Prior; Danya Glaser | Go to book overview

Subject
Index
Page numbers followed by 'n' and a numeral represent note numbers
Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) 33, 34, 35–36, 79, 123, 124, 129, 132–34, 170, 249, 254, 256–57
affectional bonds
bonding 57
caregiving, and love 57–59
commitment 56
versus relationships 57
types of 58
Ainsworth sensitivity rating scales 235
APSAC Attachment Therapy, Reactive Attachment Disorder and Attachment Problems 262–63, 265
Assessment
attachment 85–86
caregiving 86–87, 140
versus measurement 95n1
presentation structure 87–88
attachment
and autism 47–48, 268
and dependency 20
development of 18–20
intergenerational transmission of 49–55
meaning of 15
and other behavioural systems 21–22, 85
and stress response 173
summary 97–98
see also insecure attachment; secure attachment
Attachment and Loss (Bowlby) 29, 39
attachment behaviour, activation and termination of 17–18
attachment behavioural system 17, 37n2
attachment classifications disorganised attachment Group D: disorganised/ disoriented insecure attachment 27–30, 33
distribution of 30–31
normative versus non-normative samples 168
organised attachment
Group A: insecure-avoidant attachment 25–26
Group B: secure attachment 25
Group C: insecure-resistant/ ambivalent attachment 26
groups and subgroups, continuum 27
secure base/secure haven, attachment figure as 27
qualitative characteristics 24 see also attachment organisation; attachment patterns
attachment disorder classifications 12
alternative criteria 223–25
international classifications 205, 208, 214–15
DSM-IV-TR classification 184, 185, 212
ICD-10 classification 183–84, 185, 212
misunderstandings of 184, 186–87
see also Disinhibited Attachment Disorder of Childhood (DAD); Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD)
attachment disorder research
children from Romanian orphanages, adopted in Canada (Chisholm et al.)
age 4 to 6 comparison 203–4, 205
attachment security 196, 197, 198, 199, 200
indiscriminate friendly behaviour 196, 197, 199–200
role of parent, lack of investment in 197
sample groups 196, 198
severe early deprivation 195–96
children in high-risk populations, and maltreated children (Boris et al.)
diagnostic criteria 212
disrupted attachment disorder 213
findings summary 213
role reversal 213
sample groups 212
secure/attachment disorder link 213
children in high-risk populations, and maltreated children (Zeanah et al.)
attachment disorder, signs of 214–15
data collection 214
Disturbances of Attachment Interview (DAI) 214–15
methodological concerns 215
sample 214
children in residential nurseries, and later development (Hodges et al.)
adoptive versus returned-home children 193–94
age 16 years 194–95
anxiously organized attachment behaviour 191–92
attention-seeking behaviour 193
clinging behaviour 192
indiscriminate friendly behaviour 192, 193, 194, 195
inhibited attachment disorder 192–93
insecure attachment behaviour 191
institutional environment 190
nursery-raised versus comparison adolescents 194–95
returned children 194, 195
children in residential nurseries in Bucharest (Smyke et al.)
attachment disorder 209
attachment formation 209, 211–12
attachment quality 209
caregiving environment 209
child behaviour problems/ competence 210
cognitive abilities 210
disordered attachment 208
Disturbances of Attachment Interview (DAI) 208, 209
institutionalised versus community group comparisons 208–12
quality of caregiving 211
sample groups 206, 209
strange situation classifications 210
deprived children from Romania, adopted in UK (O'Connor et al.)
age 4 to 6 comparison 205
at age 6 203–4
attachment security 201, 202
deprivation 204, 205
disinhibited attachment behaviour 201–2, 203, 204, 205

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