Domestic Violence and Child Protection: Directions for Good Practice

By Cathy Humphreys; Nicky Stanley | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Page references in italics refer to figures and tables.
abduction 22–4, 54, 141, 143, 144, 160
accountability of perpetrators 103, 177–8, 180
actuarial risk assessment 172–3
adolescents
background of violence 129–31, 193
male role models, value of 78
prevention programme 70–9
violent behaviour in 131–3
Adoption and Children Act (2002) 20, 140
alcohol problems 27–9
allegations of abuse 158–61
Alternative to Violence (ATV) 193–7
assessment
ATV programmes 194
of both parents 179–80
child protection 210
contact centre safety 149–50
domestic violence situations 118–19
initial 42, 106
interviews 45–6
see also risk assessment
ATV see Alternative to Violence
Australia
court proceedings 161–7
Front-Line Response Framework 110–22
British Crime Survey (BCS) 12, 24, 28, 206–7
Canadian Violence Against Women
Survey 24
case conferences, child protection 125–6
child abduction 22–4, 54, 141, 143, 144, 160
child abuse
allegations of 158–61
domestic violence as form of 165
implicit in violence during pregnancy 22
link to domestic violence 21–2, 29–30, 58, 100–1, 126
notifications, rise in 157
NSPCC study 98–102
overlap with abuse of mother 58
and parental separation 157–8
systemic approach to treatment 102
child contact
at any cost 147–8
applications for 139
and child protection 140–1
disputes about 157–8
legislation reform 139
child contact centres 24, 141–50
child deaths 25, 38, 126, 127–8, 174, 204, 205–6
child protection issues 20–1
adolescents 129–31
case conferences 125–6
and child contact 140–1
guidance/policies 79, 209–12
interventions 126–8
multi-agency forums 39–40
outcomes, seriously deficient 129
public law 139–40
reviews, deficiencies of 128
risk assessment 175–6
violence against workers 205–9
ChildLine, calls to 53–4, 55
children
ambivalence towards violent fathers 197, 198
blaming themselves 20, 197
coping strategies 54, 61–2, 192–3
direct abuse and domestic violence 21–2, 101
disclosing violence 77, 88–9, 100, 118–19
Front-Line Response
Framework 111–22
impact of parental substance use 27
Listen Louder campaign 87–93
narrating experiences 112–13
parental empathy for 184
peer support 63, 71–2, 77–8, 87, 91
prevention programmes for 70–9
resilience of 30–1, 54
risk assessment 182–8
support for 62–6
talking about domestic violence 53–66
traumatic bond to abuser 176, 184–5
views considered in court 165
wishes regarding contact ignored 147–8
witnessing domestic violence 19–20, 55, 58–60, 101, 112, 192–3
see also adolescents
Children Act (1989) 10, 11, 20, 42, 61, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 150–1
Children Act (2004) 10, 37, 43, 137
Children and Adoption Act (2002) 10–11
children in need 42, 54, 84, 85, 113, 118–19, 140–1, 209
Children (Scotland) Act (1995) 85
Columbus programme 163–4
confidentiality issues 40–3
consultation, Front-Line Response Framework 114–15
contact see child contact
contested evidence 143–4
coping strategies, children's 54, 61–2, 192–3
counselling, of children 65–6, 165–6
court proceedings, Australia 161–7
Crime and Disorder Act (1998) 11, 39
crime prevention, social development model 70
Crime Reduction Programme 103
cycle of violence theory 70–1
Data Protection Act (1998) 41
data-sharing procedures 40–3
deaths see child deaths; murder of mothers
denial of violence 143, 182, 186, 187, 196, 197, 208
depression 20, 25, 29, 43–4
direct abuse 21–2, 54, 65, 100, 101
disclosure of domestic violence 99–101, 105–8, 118–19, 210
divorce
child abuse allegations 158–60
contact disputes 157–8
court proceedings 161–7
rates, increase in 156–7
see also parental separation
Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act (2004) 11, 45
domestic violence, definition of 13, 40
Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP) 176–88
drug abuse 27–9
dual assessments 179–80
Duluth wheels see power and control wheel
DVIP see Domestic Violence Intervention Project

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