Teaching Children with Autism and Related Spectrum Disorders: An Art and a Science

By Christy L. Magnusen | Go to book overview

Subject Index
abstract thought 55, 64, 92–3
active learning 64
aloofness 36
alternative behaviors 30
antecedent events 32
applied behavior analysis (ABA) 27, 79, 81
art and science model of teaching 22–4
Asperger's syndrome 32, 33
associations 34, 72, 80–1
attention, as motivator 29, 73
attention disorders 72
attention span 45–6
augmentative communication devices 37
autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) 11
ball pits 40
behavior management 27
behavior modification 27
behavioral checklists 77
behaviorism 26–31, 79
best practice 28, 29–30
efficacy of 27–8
features of 27
and language development 34
and self-regulation 31
techniques 28, 29–30
blankets, weighted 40
Bloom's taxonomy/hierarchy of questions 61–3
body socks 40
body–tactile–kinesthetic intelligence 60–1
boredom 75
boundary markers, visual 76–7
brain-based learning 16–17, 79
calming sensations 40
cartoons 74–5
checklists, visual 77
choices, visual cues for 77–8
classrooms
organization 49–50
tempo and style 68–75
Coalition of Essential Schools 64
communicativeness 32–3
see also social communication
complexity of autism 25–6
comprehension 81–2, 83, 85–6
compression balls 40
concentration 45–6, 72
conclusions, formulating 62, 64
conditioning, operant 80–1
consequence see reinforcement
constructivism 66–8, 69
contingencies 30
creativity 22–3
critical thinking skills 61–8
curriculum 46–9
and hands-on-learning experiences 48
and long-term outcomes 47–8
and task analysis 49
and textbooks 48
and thinking 68
curriculum bridge 48
decoding 83, 85, 87
detail-mindedness 35
diagrams 78, 87
difference 14
digital photography 94–5
directions, clear/concise 30
discrete trial training 27
discrimination 56
disorganization 49
down time, structured 50, 70–1
dynamic nature of autism 25–6
echolalia 36, 55, 84
delayed 36
encoding 83, 87
equal opportunity to respond (EOR) 73
errorless learning 80
essential questions 64–5, 67
exaggeration 75
eye contact 35
Franklin School 53
generalization 34, 81–2, 85
goals
of learning 21
social 91

-121-

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Teaching Children with Autism and Related Spectrum Disorders: An Art and a Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgment 6
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Preface 11
  • Chapter 1 - The Big Picture 13
  • Chapter 2 - How Children with Autism Think and Learn 15
  • Chapter 3 - Putting Theory into Practice 19
  • Chapter 4 - An Integrated Approach 25
  • Chapter 5 - Planning Strategies 41
  • Chapter 6 - Instructional Strategies 51
  • Conclusion 97
  • References 99
  • Further Reading 103
  • Subject Index 121
  • Author Index 125
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