Autism, Brain, and Environment

By Richard Lathe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Sincerest gratitude is owed to John O. Bishop and Caroline Lathe who commented extensively on the majority of the text, and to Ken Aitken, David St. Clair, Anna Lathe, Steve Hillier, and Corinne Skorupka who visited sections of the manuscript with helpful suggestions. Bob Isaacson, Richard Mills, Mike Ludwig, Linda Mullins, John Mullins, Evelyn Tough, Gareth Leng, Steve Hillier, Boyd Haley, William J. Walsh, Jonathan Seckl, John Arthur, Ian Reid, Sofie Dow, John Dean, Robert DeLong, Corinne Skorupka, and Robert Nataf are thanked for their many comments on different aspects of this text, and Simon Baron-Cohen, Robert DeLong, and Dennis P. Hogan for as yet unpublished manuscripts.

The following are gratefully acknowledged for personal communications of new data and ideas: James Adams, Lisa A. Croen, Julia Drew, Dennis Hogan, Wendy Kates, Vlad Kustanovich, Anne McLaren, David St. Clair, Corinne Skorupka, and William J. Walsh. Noburu Komiyama and Yuri Kotelevtsev gave invaluable assistance with translations. All those who granted permission to reproduce published figures and data are gratefully thanked. Staff at the Erskine Medical Library, the British Library, and the National Library of Scotland are thanked for their cheerful and efficient assistance.

Richard Morris is acknowledged for initiation into the world of the limbic brain, Marie-Paule Kieny for advice on vaccines, Mike Ashburner spelled out the importance of fruitflies, Pierre Chambon first pointed to direct hormone effects on the brain, while Richard Grantham introduced me to environmental issues.

Much of my research has been funded over the years by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Wellcome Trust, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), and the European Commission (EC-BIOTECH). I am very grateful for their support.

My children Anna, Mhairi, Clémence, James, and Constance have been a source of inspiration and assurance. Without M. McClenaghan and G.H. Lathe this book would not have seen light of day; I am too inarticulate to put it otherwise. True thanks are due to Jessica Kingsley, the publisher, whose perception and support brought this project to completion.

RL

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