Autism, Brain, and Environment

By Richard Lathe | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter 9
Body and Mind:
Impact of Physiological Changes
on Brain and Behavior in ASD

Just as the brain regulates the body, the body speaks back to the brain. A motivation thirst results from water depletion. A mood change tiredness is produced by exercise. Peripheral pain results in irritability and inability to concentrate. Sickness and infection make us disinclined to activity, conserving energy for the immune system. The brain is at the mercy of the body.

These are adaptive responses, but brain effects are also seen in medical conditions. In one 6-year-old girl complaining of severe migraine, with headaches and vomiting, a constriction was found in the aorta the artery carrying blood from the heart to the body. On balloon dilatation of the artery the excruciating headaches abated instantaneously.1

A child with intractable epilepsy was found to have gut problems; when these were treated the seizures could be controlled.2

A 5-year-old boy presented with fatigue and speech delay, hyperactivity, and growth retardation. Thyroid problems were diagnosed; he improved markedly once these were treated.3

In these examples we see that a physiological or biochemical problem in the body can have a major impact on the brain. Could the same be true of autism?

One young girl, 9 years of age, from time to time developed the signs of an autism disorder, with social withdrawal, speech impairment, disturbed sleep, and gut pains. The autistic features were a result of intermittent porphyria (excess porphyrins in the blood);4 when the porphyrins declined the autistic features vanished.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Autism, Brain, and Environment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.