Social Perspectives in Mental Health: Developing Social Models to Understand and Work with Mental Distress

By Jerry Tew | Go to book overview

Subject
Index
abandonment 22
abuse
homophobic 178–9
mental health implications 21–2, 112–28, 159–60
sexual or emotional 21, 77, 112–28, 159, 221
see also social/trauma model
abusers 113–15
abusive relationships 116
accessibility, of services 147
acting out 20
action planning 224–6
activities, and recovery 209
African-Caribbean people
over-use of drugs and physical treatments 133
prevalence of mental distress 131
use of compulsion and detention 132
American psychiatry, modern 66–7
Anger
gender inequality 162
social/trauma model 117–18
Anglo-Saxon societies, risk discourse 185
anorexia 44, 114, 117, 120
anti-convulsants 63
anti-depressants 206
anti-oppressive practice 13, 17
anti-psychiatrists 37
anti-psychiatry 20–1, 55–6
Antipsychiatrie 56
Anxiety
internalization of powerlessness 72
levels of trust 97
social/trauma model 114, 118
Asian people
over-use of drugs and physical treatments 133
prevalence of mental distress 131–2
attachment, mental distress 22
authority
definition of 139
oppressive 140, 142
practitioners' use of 138–41
protective 140, 142
autonomy see undermining autonomy
aversion therapy 169–70, 172–3
back to work packages 211
Barnet Crisis Intervention Team 195
behavioural family therapy 13
behavioural treatments, homosexuality 172
bereavement 22
bi-polar disorder, genetic markers 63
biochemical hypothesis 63
biomedical model 7
attraction of 9
dominance of 14, 36
homosexuality 170
inherent problem with 35
mental illness 56
persistence of 42–3
recovery 27
violence 35–6
see also neo-Kraepelinian approach
Black, defined 130
Black service users 129–49
compulsion and detention 132
drugs and physical treatments, overuse of 133
mental distress, prevalence of 131–2
mental health services
experience of 133–5
five challenges 145–8
holistic approach 144
lack of appropriate 132–3
quick fix, addiction to 137
slavery and colonialism revisited 135–7
mental health system 130–1
social models, prerequisites for 137–44
social support and recovery 208
bonding social capital 93–4
boundary difficulties 116–17, 127
Bourdieu, Pierre 86, 91, 223
Bowling Alone 92
Bradford Group 53
breakdown 24–5, 218–9
Breaking the Circles of Fear 133, 141
bridging social capital 94
bullying, self-harm 179
capabilities, focusing on people's 219
carbamazepine 63
care, in mental health practice 224
Care Programme Approach 37, 224
carers
exposure to mental health risks 157–8
risk avoidance 190–1
caring responsibilities 24–5, 157–8
Charter of Needs and Demands 43
chemical treatment responses 33
child sexual abuse see abuse
chromosome 5 63
chromosome 11 63
citizenship, demonisation of mental distress 82–5
civic traditions, social capital 92
clinical work, risk taking in 194–7
co-operative power 74, 78–9, 80, 81
cognitive social capital 93–5
Coleman, James 91–2
collusive power 74, 76–7, 80–1, 82
colonialism 135–7
Common Agenda project 47
communication patterns, mental distress 23
community building 211
community mental health services
lack of appropriate, Black users 132–3
and recovery 210
community mental health teams, users' engagement with 104–5
community treatment orders 186, 189–90
compulsory orders, African-Caribbean people 132
confidence, abused victims' lack of 115
control
abused victims' need to 119–20
colonialism 136
equality of, in debate of knowledge 49
service users' experiences 133
see also personal control
coping strategy, mental distress viewed as 20, 24

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