Social Work Theories in Action

By Mary Nash; Robyn Munford et al. | Go to book overview

Subject index
anti-social behaviour 244
Aotearoa/New Zealand
ecological systems approach 43
indigenous knowledge/ frameworks 70, 100, 196–8
legislation 67, 176, 232
social work 10–12
research/literature 38–9, 219
text for practice 20–6, 87, 97–8, 104, 158–61, 167
assessment35, 42, 50–1, 54, 70, 80, 86, 91, 143, 177–9, 182–3
attachment-focused
see also intervention 207, 211–13, 231–5, 241, 245–8
changing practices 21, 35
ecological frameworks/tools 31, 42, 50–1
family 17
integrated framework 24
Life Model 35
placement (alternative care)
228–34
risk 185–7, 192, 228–9
see also attachment; HIV/ AIDS; intervention
asylum seekers 141, 145–8, 150
attachment
abused or abusing parents
218, 220
assessment adult attachment interview 211, 219, 231, 243
Attachment Q–Sort 213
strange situation procedure 211, 213, 217–19, 224
bonding 211–12
brain development 209
care and protection concerns 226
caregiver(s) 211–12, 230–2, 241, 243, 245, 228
children as 58
principal/primary 213
culture 208–11, 220, 247
disorganized patterns 218–19
early development of 208–9
history 209–11
loss 58, 60, 81, 161, 209, 211, 219, 243, 253
non-attachment 213
separation 175, 209, 213–14, 227, 229, 232, 243, 246
Australia
attachment research 219
ecological systems theory 38–9, 43–4
indigenous populations 44
migrants/refugees 146
social work practice 10, 16, 26
civic social work 140, 150
client empowerment 148
collective
action 35
approaches, methods, strategies 71, 98, 109
responsibilities 198
work 95, 99, 104–5, 110–11
collective good 125, 136
collectivity 126, 129, 132–3, 136
colonization 11–12, 67, 69–70, 100, 115, 127
colonizing discourse 45
community development
bicultural context 97
definitions 98–9
environment 124–5
integrated framework 15–19
key principles 25, 95–6, 99, 106
literature 39
locating oneself 102, 110
Maori 119
power relations 102–3
praxis (relationship between theory and practice) 108
trauma 65
workers 15–19, 56, 98, 100, 103, 107, 125, 140, 147, 158–62
see also social change; migrants/refugees;
Tongan community/ community work;
working collectively
community intervention 57–8, 70, 131–2, 136
Community Marae 113
competence
identifying areas 163, 165, 183, 191
in social work 55–6
see also cultural competency
critical incident 71–4
critical reflection 10, 83, 87, 106, 110, 126, 135, 251, 252
cultural competency 143, 148–9
change 135–7
training 148
culture and attachment see attachment
difference and diversity 90, 159
discourse analysis 23, 103, 107
alternative 160
competing 36
dominant 23, 26, 105, 159, 163
family life 170
power 163
reflective 85, 90
DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, American Psychiatric Association) 66–7, 76, 84
ecological niche 218
ecomap 37, 39, 41–5
emotional development 208–9
empowerment 143–51, 159, 162, 175, 181, 236
HIV/AIDS 52
internal community worker 130
theories of 19, 35
evaluation
case 259–60
ecological principles 74–5
practice 23
practitioner 191
research and 166
family
group conference 234
interaction 208
resources 170, 175
violence 208
see also assessment; intervention; discourse analysis
field of practice 65, 83–4, 87, 140–2
group work 82, 242, 248

-267-

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