Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children Including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (Asd), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development : Development Guides for Professionals and Parents

By James D. Macdonald | Go to book overview

1
The 30-Year Journey
with 1000 Children
How Communicating Partners Came About

In 1971, I took an assistant professorship at the Ohio State University after completing a Ph.D. in Communication Disorders at the University of Minnesota. The program at Minnesota was an equal combination of speech pathology and psychology. The prevailing approaches then were behavioral psychology and cognitive child psychology as applied to a wide range of communication disorders. Some find the two schools of B.F. Skinner (the “father of behaviorism”) and Jean Piaget (the “father of cognitive psychology”) incompatible. I found them perplexing but eventually very compatible. While the functional analyses of behavior showed me the strength of environmental influences on behavior, the cognitive child analyses introduced me to the mind of the child and the critical issue that children live in a distinctly distinct world from adults.

My dissertation was a study of how very differently people perceive and evaluate the speech behaviors of persons identified as stutterers. The study confirmed the clinical finding that regular people differ widely in what they consider the problem of stuttering. This work suggested that a communication disorder is as much a function of the observer as it is of the behavior of the speaker (Macdonald 1972). At that time, I had two most intriguing problems: first, the effects of a speaker's partner on his communication, and second, the gnarly problem of getting newly learned behaviors to generalize into the child's daily life. One thing I learned from my adviser, Richard Martin, is that it is much more accurate to describe what a speaker is doing than to label him

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communicating Partners: 30 Years of Building Responsive Relationships with Late-Talking Children Including Autism, Asperger's Syndrome (Asd), Down Syndrome, and Typical Development : Development Guides for Professionals and Parents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.