Asperger Syndrome and Psychotherapy: Understanding Asperger Perspectives

By Paula Jacobsen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The knowledge I have about Asperger Syndrome comes from the children and parents in my clinical practice. I am very thankful and appreciative for all that we have learned together.

I first heard about theory of mind and central coherence from Linda Lotspeich. These are the concepts that seemed to make sense of many aspects of the thinking and behavior of those with Asperger's. In my clinical work, I used these concepts with children and adults as we worked together to understand the Asperger mind.

Parents in my practice and I have developed intervention plans that have evolved, as we use them. Pam Ehrlich prepared a working model of the Reference Binder. I appreciate these contributions and have included some samples in the Appendices.

This book was written because of my participation in something that was initially quite unrelated to my work with Asperger Syndrome. Cleo Eulau is a distinguished clinical social worker. She has served as a teacher, supervisor, mentor and role model to countless mental health professionals. Cleo was the head of social work in the Child Psychiatry Department at Stanford for many years, has taught at Smith College, has been in private practice for many years, and serves on the Voluntary Clinical Faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine as a Clinical Professor. In 1994, the Cleo Eulau Center (CEC) was founded and named for Cleo, who has been a participant in, and advisor to, the agency. The mission of the CEC is to help children and adolescents who have experienced adversity to grow to become competent adults. I have been an advisor to the agency since its inception. This was an opportunity for me to participate as a volunteer to an agency that served children who were unlikely to be seen by therapists in private practice.

In 1996, Candace Pierce became director of the agency, and I participated in discussions and later in a study group that developed a school consultation intervention to address the agency's goals. Research about resiliency speaks powerfully to a strengths perspective and the impact of relationships on positive psychological development. We developed a school Resiliency Consultant role, based on recognition of the importance of a child's relation-

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