Murder 101: Homicide and Its Investigation

By Robert L. Snow | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Cold Case Investigation

For teenagers who lived during the 1970s in Belle Haven, a gated community near Greenwich, Connecticut, the night before Halloween had become known as [Mischief Night.] It was the night when the teenagers, armed with shaving cream and toilet paper, played pranks on their neighbors. In 1975, however, it became the last night in the short life of fifteen-year-old Martha Moxley.

The pretty blond teenager, whose family had moved to Connecticut from California a little over a year before, had almost immediately upon moving in attracted the attention of most of the teenage boys in Belle Haven, including Thomas and Michael Skakel, who lived across the street from the Moxleys. The Skakels were close relatives of the Kennedy family. However, Thomas and Michael Skakel were known around Belle Haven as rude and unruly. Most people who knew them felt that the boys had become this way because they saw very little discipline meted out from their widowed father, who, according to neighbors, spent most of his time traveling and drinking.

[Both boys [Thomas and Michael] had reputations among critics as unruly, out of control and violent boozers,] said an article in Insight Magazine. [And both had their sights set on the new girl in the neighborhood, Martha Moxley, the recent blond arrival from California.]1

On Mischief Night 1975, Martha's mother, Dorothy Moxley, had set a curfew for her daughter and waited in the living room for her to return,

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Murder 101: Homicide and Its Investigation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 - Murder in America 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Crime Scene 31
  • Chapter 3 - The Body 57
  • Chapter 4 73
  • Chapter 5 - Interview and Interrogation 93
  • Chapter 6 - Developing Suspects 119
  • Chapter 7 - Cold Case Investigation 135
  • Chapter 8 - The Trial 149
  • Chapter 9 - Secondary Victims of Murder 165
  • Some Final Thoughts 179
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 205
  • About the Author 213
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