Murder 101: Homicide and Its Investigation

By Robert L. Snow | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
Secondary Victims of
Murder

Starting in 1979, a serial murderer began a killing spree in the Detroit and Ann Arbor areas of Michigan. Because most of the early murders took place on Sunday mornings, the news media dubbed the killer [The Sunday Morning Slasher.] Homicide detectives investigating these murders soon began suspecting a man named Coral Eugene Watts of being the culprit. In order to gather evidence against Watts, detectives began an around-the-clock surveillance of him, even going so far as to attach a tracking device to his vehicle. Watts, however, apparently suspecting that the police were on to him, soon moved to Houston, Texas, where he quickly continued his killing spree.

Unfortunately, at this time the Houston Police Department was extremely understaffed and had little money for overtime; therefore, the police department couldn't keep tabs on Watts as well as it should have, and it is believed that he killed at least a dozen women in Texas. Finally, however, on May 23, 1982, the police arrested Watts when they caught him soon after he had broken into an apartment and attempted to drown the woman who lived there.

Watts had already killed one woman on the morning of May 23, 1982, but later told the police that he just didn't feel satisfied yet. Looking for more prey, he spotted a woman as she pulled her car into an apartment area parking lot. He sat and watched her as she got out of her car and then

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Murder 101: Homicide and Its Investigation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 - Murder in America 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Crime Scene 31
  • Chapter 3 - The Body 57
  • Chapter 4 73
  • Chapter 5 - Interview and Interrogation 93
  • Chapter 6 - Developing Suspects 119
  • Chapter 7 - Cold Case Investigation 135
  • Chapter 8 - The Trial 149
  • Chapter 9 - Secondary Victims of Murder 165
  • Some Final Thoughts 179
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 205
  • About the Author 213
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