National Security in Saudi Arabia: Threats, Responses, and Challenges

By Anthony H. Cordesman; Nawaf Obaid | Go to book overview

About the Authors

Anthony H. Cordesman holds the Arleigh A. Burke Chair in Strategy at CSIS. He is also a national security analyst for ABC News and a frequent commentator on National Public Radio and the BBC. The author of more than 30 books on U.S. security policy, energy policy, and the Middle East, his most recent publications include The War after the War: Strategic Lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan (CSIS, 2004); The Military Balance in the Middle East (Praeger, 2004); Energy Developments in the Middle East (Praeger, 2004); and The Iraq War: Strategy, Tactics, and Military Lessons (CSIS, 2003).

Nawaf Obaid is a Saudi national security and intelligence consultant based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He is currently the managing director of the Saudi National Security Assessment Project. He was a former senior research fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP). He also was the project director for the study, "Sino-Saudi Energy Rapprochement and the Implications for US National Security," conducted for the adviser and director for net assessments to the U.S. Secretary of Defense. His studies, reports, and opinion pieces in newspapers such as the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the International Herald Tribune can be downloaded from the Internet by doing a name search.

He is the author of a book on Saudi oil policy, The Oil Kingdom at 100: Petroleum Policymaking in Saudi Arabia (WINEP Editions), and is currently writing a new one, The Struggle for the Saudi Soul: Royalty, Islamic Militancy and Reform in the Kingdom, to be published in 2005. He has a BS from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, an MA from Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, and has completed doctoral courses at MIT's security studies program.

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