The AMA Handbook of Project Management

By Paul C. Dinsmore; Jeannette Cabanis-Brewin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 21
Enterprise Project Management:
Elements and Deployment Issues

?CHRIS VANDERSLUIS, HMS SOFTWARE

Enterprise project management (EPM) is the Holy Grail of project management: The idea that all project management information, reporting, and analysis will be part of an allencompassing system where virtually every activity, every hour of time, and every dollar spent can be instantly identified.

It's not just senior management that is interested in the subject, although at first glance, they have the most to gain. The Project Management Office (PMO)-or in its absence, whatever level is available of professional project schedulers and project managers-is highly interested in getting access to all levels of data regarding project management. The antithesis of enterprise project management would be an ad-hoc process where everyone does his or her own thing. This is by far the most common scenario we find in organizations today. A PMO can't function without project data and if everyone is doing something different, data isn't easy to come by. For the PMO, getting to see the lowest level of project data is very attractive.

Individual team leaders are interested in seeing the interproject impact of different project groups, and the ability to resolve resource conflicts between teams is one of the most significant impacts on project performance.

Even team members are interested in the concept. Team members in organizations that manage "by emergency" or continuously in a reactive mode, see tremendous potential benefits in EPM, hoping that an integrated process might bring order to chaos.

What is this phenomenon we refer to as EPM? Like most three-letter acronyms, EPM is bandied about like a complex mysterious topic, but its basis will be familiar to anyone in

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