The Elements of Résumé Style: Essential Rules and Eye-Opening Advice for Writing Résumés and Cover Letters That Work

By Scott Bennett | Go to book overview

5
Deliver Your Message the
Right Way to the Right
Places
Whether, how, when, and where to send your résumé are decisions as important as the decisions you make as you design each element of its content.
Sending Your Résumé
Employers often receive résumés so unrelated to the requirements for an available position (and cover letters so devoid of enthusiasm) that they openly wonder why candidates even bothered to send them. This happens a lot.Sending a résumé—no matter how well written—in response to an unsuitable opening is a common and easily preventable cause for receiving no invitation to interview. Ask yourself:
Do I meet all or almost all requirements for the position?*
Am I really interested in the work, hours, and location?

If either answer is no, then do not send your résumé. If both answers

*In a job ad, the words preferred, helpful, desirable, and a plus do not mean [required.]
Sometimes, candidates confuse these terms and, as a result miss out on many opportuni-
ties. Do not rule yourself out from responding to an ad because you don't have everything
on an employer's wish list. Like everyone else, an employer may prefer lots of things. So
what? Smart, caring, and enthusiastic candidates are easily trainable and often just what an
employer needs. In the eyes of many hiring managers, these qualities easily outweigh the
absence of one or two [preferred] items.

-57-

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