Questions That Work: How to Ask Questions That Will Help You Succeed in Any Business Situation

By Andrew Finlayson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Raising Your I.Q.Q.

The true test of intelligence is not how much we know how to do, but
how we behave when we don't know what to do.

JOHN HOLT1

In this chapter we introduce a different description of intelligence. It is the Intelligent Questioning Quotient, or I.Q.Q. Like many forms of intelligence, it represents the ability to identify ideas and connect concepts. I.Q.Q. is a description of intelligence that supports the many other forms. If there are right and left brains and a variety of intelligences, they are all supported by unconscious questioning and the need for answers. While there has long been a debate about whether you can increase your standard I.Q., I believe there is a way to raise your Intelligent Questioning Quotient with a straightforward, seven-step assessment process. Through this process, you can discover the different aspects that are part of any inquiry. Identifying each of these aspects is the process of learning how to question effectively.


Assessment—Seven Steps to Better Questions

Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts.

SØREN KIERKEGAARD

Questions are a process of discovery. This description makes asking questions sound like the adventure it can be, an exploration into the unknown. Someone has observed that an insightful question is one of the most challenging acts of creativity possible. An original and useful question is born of an active and open mind, a process involving many levels of thought and experience.

One way to judge the competency of another is by the questions the person asks. You can, for example, judge a teacher by the quality of the questions he asks his students. Doctors, therapists, lawyers, and journalists all use questions as a fundamental technique. In researching

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