Questions That Work: How to Ask Questions That Will Help You Succeed in Any Business Situation

By Andrew Finlayson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
QUESTIONS THAT WORK WHEN:
Meeting and Planning

Do I contradict myself? Very well then, I contradict myself.

WALT WHITMAN

To transform ideas into reality, you need to capture information inside and outside the organization, create relationships, and master the evaluation and decision-making process. The playing field for many of these activities is the conference room, where questions need to be asked as the company officials meet, plan, and manage projects. Positive questions help keep people involved and focused as they decide the fundamental issues of quantity, quality, time, logistics, collaborations, and design.1 In short, those who use inquiry can have greater confidence that they can deliver on time and on budget. It is a questioning discipline that should begin the moment anyone decides that something needs to be done.

When planning and meeting, your aim should be to tap into the experience of others (one of the most effective learning tools you can use). A successful meeting builds a chain of connections. The leaders of the meeting, while keeping to an agenda, should be open to new issues and developments, for inquiry is in part the science of surprise, and dissent and disagreement are part of any healthy process of project management. Successful businesspeople realize there is a close connection between the dollar sign and the question mark.


10/1 Having a Meeting

Assessment

How many productive hours of employees are slowly strangled in meetings? How many employees want meetings to be over before they begin? Those attending meetings often resist asking or inviting time-consuming questions, wanting only the orders for what to do, rather than a dis

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