Questions That Work: How to Ask Questions That Will Help You Succeed in Any Business Situation

By Andrew Finlayson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
QUESTIONS THAT WORK WHEN:
Managing Your Career

Try not to become a man of success but rather to become a man of value.

ALBERT EINSTEIN

Planned progress depends on promptly possessing information about the actions and decisions of others, information most efficiently and directly gathered with questions. Continuous positive questioning creates deep knowledge. New challenges and the rewards that come with them are thus the result of questions asked of your boss and coworkers. During negotiations over pay and status that define so much of the work world, you do get what you ask for. In short, management of your career results from management of your inquiry.

If you agree that work should be more than a title on the door and a six-figure paycheck, questions will lead you to work you truly love doing. Lucetta Marty, a survey respondent, and director of the Creativity Tank, asks a question everyone should consider: “What do you try without being forced?”1 The answer tells you a great deal. Variations on the question include, “When did you do something that no one taught you?” and “Where have you been that no one took or sent you?” The answer shows you where your heart has taken you, the skill, task, and place you could happily make a living. It is a matter of, as Peller Marion, a career counselor, once said, of redefining success to fit your desires. She said that you need to “develop a plan just the way you have a strategy to put money away for retirement or a plan to save money for your kids' education. “You have” to develop a strategy and a plan to look at your career and redefine it.” She warned against becoming one of the many people who “get into a routine that's very comfortable and “that” solves 70 percent of their problems and so they settle.”2 Questions keep you from settling for less than what you want. Inquiry accelerates ambitions and accomplishments.

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