Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting and Orienting New Employees

By Diane Arthur | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Electronic Recruiting

Long-time HR specialists undoubtedly remember receiving stacks of resumes sent either by search firms, in response to newspaper ads, or through one of the other more traditional recruitment resources described in Chapter 2. Too busy to do them justice during a typical workday, you probably loaded these resumes into your briefcase and dutifully reviewed them during the commute home or after dinner in front of the TV (muted, of course). As the evening grew later and you came across a resume longer than one or two pages, you groaned, fighting the temptation to “file” it for violating the unwritten law against submitting a resume that is too long for a tired HR professional to review at the end of a busy day.

The process of receiving and reviewing resumes and employment applications has changed dramatically over the past decade. Increasingly, employers are using the Internet to recruit, either by developing an online presence of their own or by linking up with Web-based job search services. Applicants, too, are preparing and transmitting many more resumes electronically, thereby relieving recruiters from being inundated with thousands of paper resumes. The Internet, then, is rapidly moving up in the ranks of recruitment, as many more applicants and employers communicate with one another, computer to computer.

Definition of an Applicant

As a result of the onslaught of resumes and applications transmitted electronically, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has proposed guidelines to define when a person who applies for a job over the Internet is considered an applicant. This is important since employers are required to keep records for applicants on the basis of race, gender, or ethnicity, to preclude charges of discrimination. Until recently, the definition of an applicant applied to anyone who expressed an interest in a given job. Matters became complicated, however, when people started sending out dozens of electronic resumes without a particular job in mind. It's not uncommon for individuals to be unaware of which organizations receive their resumes.

The guidelines, formulated over a period of more than three years, are the result of the combined efforts of the EEOC, the Department of Labor's Office of Federal

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting and Orienting New Employees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.