How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills

By Nan Levinson | Go to book overview

About This Course

As one course among many offered by the American Management Association's curriculum, How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills is designed for current and future managers. Even with the rapid changes in communication technology, writing remains a basic and crucial skill for businesspeople at all levels. In this course, you will learn what constitutes good writing and how you can achieve it through specific and practical strategies.

Beginning with prewriting steps, you will learn how to write for your readers, do research, and organize your material logically. You will learn techniques for forceful, direct, and effective writing; review the basics of grammar and punctuation; and be alerted to common pitfalls and ways to avoid them. Through explanations, examples, checklists, and self-directed exercises, you will practice these techniques, focusing on the types of writing managers do most often—letters, memorandums, proposals, reports, and e-mail. Finally, you will consider some issues that new communication technologies raise for business writers. Because good writers develop their ability through practice, How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills is interactive, allowing you to put the suggestions you read to immediate use. In addition, the lists and summaries will serve as a useful reference after you complete the course.

Good business writers know how to communicate information, present and defend their ideas, and persuade others to adopt their point of view. Through this course, you will have the opportunity to join their ranks by learning how to make the written word work for you.

Nan Levinson is a writer and teacher. Her journalism has appeared in publications such as The New York Times, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, and American Way, as well as online and in publications abroad. She was the U.S. correspondent for the international magazine Index on Censorship for eight years and is working on a book about people caught in free speech controversies. In addition, she has published short stories and two cookbooks. Levinson teaches writing at Tufts University and previously taught at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, Bentley College, and Sangamon State

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About This Course xi
  • How to Take This Course xiii
  • Pre-Test xv
  • 1: Writng for Your Reader 1
  • 2: Getting Organized 19
  • 3: Types of Business Writing 39
  • 4: Effective Writing 57
  • 5: The Right Word: Appropriate Language 75
  • 6: Language That Works 91
  • 7: Direct and Forceful Writing 105
  • 8: Write and Rewrite: Punctuating and Revising 121
  • 9: Research: Fact-Finding Missions 137
  • 10: Plugging In: Computers and Business Communication 155
  • Bibliography 169
  • Post-Test 171
  • Index 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.