How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills

By Nan Levinson | Go to book overview

Index
Abstract nouns, 112–113
Abstract words, 113–114
Abstracts, 144
Active verbs, 106–110
Ad hominem attack, 25
Addressee, 404–2
Addresses, format, 40
All right vs. alright, 97
Among vs. between, 97
Amount vs. number, 97
Annual reports, 50
Antecedent, 85
Apostrophe, 127–128
Argument, constructing, 23
Audience, 4–5
organizational level, 6–8
personal characteristics, 8–9
technical expertise, 7
Audit reports, 50
Backup copies, 162
Bandwagon approach, 25
Begging the question, 24
Between vs. among, 97
Block format, 40
Body
letter, 42, 43–45
proposals, 48–9
Bookmarks, 142
Books, as sources, 147–148
Bring vs. take, 97
Business letters. See Letters
Business records. See Records
Can vs. may, 97
Categorization sequence method, 32
Cause and effect sequence method, 33
Central point, 58
Charts, 47
Chat rooms, 159–160
Chronology sequence method, 31–32
Clauses, 58, 101
Clear reference principle, 85
Clichés, 116–117
Closing, in letters, 42–43
Cold words, 94
Collaborative writing, 51–52
Colon, 126
Commas, 123–125
Comma splice, 64
Communication paths, 5–7
Communication, electronic, 158–165
Compared to vs. compared with vs. contrast with, 97
Comparison sequence method, 33–34
Complex sentences, 59–60
Compound sentences, 58–59
Computers, use in writing, 157–158
Concise writing, 99–103
Conclusion, 49
Concrete language, 110–116
Concrete nouns, 112
Condensing, 101–102
Connotation, 79–80, 92–95
Content, 3
Contrast with vs. compared with
vs. compared to, 97
Copyright protection, 163–164
Dangling modifiers, 70–71
Dash, 126–127
Databases, 143–144
Definition, 77
Delivery, of letters, 44
Denotation, 79–80
Details, 26–27. See also Evidence
Developing topic, 22–27
Dictionaries, 76–79
Direct object, 106
Direct organization pattern, 27–28
Directories, online, 143
Disinterested vs. uninterested, 97
E-mail, 158–159
memorandum format, 45
privacy, 162–163
e.g. (for example), 125
Editing, 133–134
Either/or argument, 24
Electronic bulletin boards, 159–160
Ellipsis, 130
Emphasis, 62–64
End marks, 122–123
Evidence. See also Details
criteria, 23
organizing, 29–35
Exclamation point, 123
Executive summary, 48
External proposal, 48
External readers, 7
Facts. See Evidence
False analogy, 24
Faulty reasoning, 24
Feedback questions, 140
Fewer vs. less, 98
Figuratively vs. virtually vs. literally, 98
Fillers, 99–100

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