Writers on Writing: The Art of the Short Story

By Maurice A. Lee | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

DONALD ANDERSON is editor of War, Literature, and the Arts: An International Journal of the Humanities. He is editor also of Aftermath: An Anthology of Post-Vietnam Fiction and Andre Dubus: Tributes. His collection Fire Road won Iowa's John Simmons Short Fiction Award. He lives in Colorado.

AMIRI BARAKA is an American poet, playwright, and political activist. Born as LeRoi Jones, Baraka studied at Rutgers and Howard Universities, receiving his B.A. in 1954. He gained notoriety in 1964 when four of his plays—Dutchman, The Toilet, The Baptism, and The Slave—were produced off-Broadway in New York City. A provocative political analyst, he has written many works that express a strident anger toward the racism of mainstream white American society. Working with his second wife, Amina Baraka, he edited Confirmation: An Anthology of African-American Women(1983). His collected fiction was published in 2000.

ALFRED BIRNEY (not to be confused with the Canadian poet Earle Alfred Birney) is a multicultural writer from the Netherlands, although most of his works cross literary borders drawn by critics and academics. His father is Eurasian, his mother Dutch. He was born in The Hague in 1951 and raised in different parts of the country. He was a musician until he was 30 years old. While he published articles and books in this field, he also started to write his first fictional stories. However, music stayed paramount. An injury to his left hand while practicing martial arts prevented him from pursuing his musical career and tipped the scales towards literature.

CLARK BLAISE is the child of expatriate Canadians who roamed the United States in search of better employment. Blaise has written, “As a native-born American with foreign parents, and as a child who attended an average of

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