Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000

By Antoon De Baets | Go to book overview

D

DENMARK
1989Several researchers called Danish archival access policy extremely restrictive. The policy reportedly forced historians and journalists to study contemporary Danish history in the archives of Washington and London and seriously hampered historical research.

SOURCES

Vandkunsten: Konflikt, politik og historie udgives af, 1989, no.l (Special issue "Tankekontrol og historieskrivning: Arkivpolitik fra NATO til glasnost") 185–87.


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
1930–61The historiography of the Dominican Republic suffered greatly from the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo and its official ideology of Hispanidad ("Hispanicity"). Research that would unveil the country's African past was largely forbidden. The Academia Dominicana de la Historia (Dominican Academy of History) was empowered to apply legal sanctions if its verdict in controversial matters was contested. The regime's historian, Manuel Arturo Peña Battle (1902– 54), a minister of interior affairs (1943) and external affairs (1943– 45), fell out of favor with Trujillo toward the end of his life: Peña Battle had rejected the positivist ideas of the liberal historian Eugenio María de Hostos (1839–1903) as incompatible with the country's Hispanic and Catholic character, but a survey among intellectuals commissioned by the government valued Hostos's work as beneficial in its time. Among those who worked outside the of-

-188-

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Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • A 39
  • B 59
  • C 88
  • D 188
  • E 191
  • F 202
  • G 212
  • H 254
  • I 269
  • J 310
  • K 321
  • L 335
  • M 339
  • N 358
  • P 370
  • Q 409
  • R 410
  • S 424
  • T 456
  • U 476
  • V 598
  • Y 604
  • Z 620
  • Person Index 627
  • Subject Index 665
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