Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000

By Antoon De Baets | Go to book overview

J

JAMAICA
1968On 15 October Walter Rodney (1942–80), a Marxist history lecturer from Guyana at the University of the West Indies, Kingston, since January, was refused reentry in Jamaica after having attended a Black Writers' Conference in Montreal and was sent back to Canada. As a history lecturer, he had organized many popular off-campus lectures for nonacademic audiences, including Rastafarians and the urban poor, in which African history and the concept of Black Power were discussed. This was considered a security threat to the government. The vice chancellor, however, refused to terminate his contract and therefore Rodney was served with a banning order. His writings were banned. In the wake of the ensuing student protests, serious riots (known as the Rodney Riots) took place on 16 and 17 October. The university was kept under a state of siege for over a week. In an emergency debate in the House of Representatives broadcast live throughout Jamaica on radio and television, Prime Minister Hugh Shearer accused Rodney of communist views.

Also see Guyana (1974–96: Rodney).


SOURCES

Payne, A., "The Rodney Riots in Jamaica: The Background and Significance of the Events of October 1968", Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, 1983, no.2: 158–74.


JAPAN

Since the adoption of the Fundamental Law of Education (1947), the Ministry of Education has screened all history textbook manuscripts at primary and sec

-310-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • A 39
  • B 59
  • C 88
  • D 188
  • E 191
  • F 202
  • G 212
  • H 254
  • I 269
  • J 310
  • K 321
  • L 335
  • M 339
  • N 358
  • P 370
  • Q 409
  • R 410
  • S 424
  • T 456
  • U 476
  • V 598
  • Y 604
  • Z 620
  • Person Index 627
  • Subject Index 665
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 696

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.