Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000

By Antoon De Baets | Go to book overview

R

ROMANIA

During the communist years (1948–89), most historians lived in isolation, except during a relatively liberal period from 1965 to the early 1970s. Some topics were described as "the great taboos of official communist historiography": the monarchy, the army, the parliamentary system, and the political parties (including the Romanian Communist Party, the history of Transylvania (a region with a large Hungarian–speaking minority), Bessarabia and northern Bukovina (annexed by the USSR in 1940), Russo–Romanian relations, and universal history. The history of religions could be added. Government decrees of 1947–48 outlawed the circulation of some seven hundred publications covering the former Romanian–ruled provinces of Bessarabia and Bukovina and the royal family. Several purges of historians took place, especially between 1947–48 and 1959. After the reform of education (1947) and of the Romanian Academy (June 1948), the most important historians were reportedly removed from their posts and often imprisoned. Their works and those of many Romanian historians of the past were banned from the library catalogs and the antiquarian bookshops, as they were called the legacy of the liquidated fascist regime. As a reaction, some historians reportedly took refuge in technical professionalism, others went into exile. Around 1965, some of the prewar historians, such as Constantin Giurescu "q.v. pre–1954" and Panaitescu "q.v. pre–1954", were rehabilitated and became active again. The state archives kept part of the prewar documents only. Those regarded as "sensitive" (such as documents relating to the royal family, the political parties, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) were placed in reserved archives, mainly those of the Romanian Communist Party (RCP) History Institute. Only some of these archives became accessible after 1990. In Transylvania the government "rationalized" archives and libraries. The 1948 law of nationalization, the 1971 National Archives Law, and the 1974 Law for the Protection

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Censorship of Historical Thought: A World Guide, 1945-2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • A 39
  • B 59
  • C 88
  • D 188
  • E 191
  • F 202
  • G 212
  • H 254
  • I 269
  • J 310
  • K 321
  • L 335
  • M 339
  • N 358
  • P 370
  • Q 409
  • R 410
  • S 424
  • T 456
  • U 476
  • V 598
  • Y 604
  • Z 620
  • Person Index 627
  • Subject Index 665
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