Selling the Dream: Why Advertising Is Good Business

By John Hood | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 9
Conclusion
As long as there has been advertising, there has been change in advertising. As we have seen, the modern marketing mix of the early twenty-first century is the result of an evolutionary process extending back in time not just decades but centuries. Yes, sometimes there have been periods akin to punctuated equilibrium—the introduction of new advertising media or techniques that were clearly noticeable at the time because of either the type or locale of change, such as the 1830s debut of the penny press in New York City or the arrival of national broadcast advertising in the late 1920s and early 1930s. But for every supposed “revolution” in advertising, one can often find an analogue in the past.Consider a series of events during the 2001–2004 period illustrating what many perceived—and rightly so, for the most part—to be significant changes in the way goods and services were being marketed to consumers in America and around the world:
In 2003, DaimlerChrysler hired a firm to design a computer game based around its Wrangler Rubicon. The resulting Jeep 4x4: Trail of Life game cost little to produce and was distributed for free on the company's website. Within six months, a quarter of a million

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selling the Dream: Why Advertising Is Good Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?