Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864

By Earl J. Hess | Go to book overview

Illustrations

Confederate line, Manassas Junction    33

Hurdle revetment in Confederate fort, Manassas Junction    34

Artillery emplacement in Confederate fort, Manassas Junction    35

Confederate works, Centreville    36

Fort Totten, defenses of Washington    38

Magazine of Fort Totten, defenses of Washington    39

Fort Slemmer, defenses of Washington    40

Remnants of Confederate Camp Bartow, West Virginia    55

Remnants of Confederate defenses at Camp Alleghany, West Virginia    56

Confederate fort, Centreville    68

Quaker guns at Centreville    70

Federal Battery No. 1, Yorktown    75

Confederate artillery emplacement, Yorktown    82

Approach to Grapevine Bridge, Chickahominy River    103

Federal Fort Sumner, Fair Oaks    106

Federal artillery position at Fair Oaks    107

Federal engineers corduroying a road, Peninsula campaign    108

Federal works at the battle of Mechanicsville    121

Railroad cut at Second Manassas    135

Loudoun Heights and Maryland Heights, Harpers Ferry    141

Sunken road, Antietam    148

Remnants of Confederate artillery emplacements at Prospect Hill, Fredericksburg    160

The stone wall, Fredericksburg    162

-viii-

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Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Maps x
  • Preface xi
  • 1: Engineering War 1
  • 2: On to Richmond 28
  • 3: Western Virginia and Eastern North Carolina 47
  • 4: The Peninsula 67
  • 5: From Seven Pines to the Seven Days 96
  • 6: Second Manassas, Antietam, and the Maryland Campaign 130
  • 7: Fredericksburg 154
  • 8: Chancellorsville 174
  • 9: Goldsborough, New Bern, Washington, and Suffolk 200
  • 10: Gettysburg and Lee's Pennsylvania Campaign 215
  • 11: Charleston 241
  • 12: The Reduction of Battery Wagner 259
  • 13: From Bristoe Station to the Fall of Plymouth 289
  • Conclusion 308
  • Appendix 1 - The Design and Construction of Field Fortifications at Yorktown 315
  • Appendix 2 - Preserving the Field Fortifications at Gettysburg 331
  • Glossary 333
  • Notes 341
  • Bibliography 393
  • Index 417
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