The Invention of Politics in the European Avant-Garde (1906-1940)

By Sascha Bru; Gunther Martens | Go to book overview

Cultural Hegemony and Avant-Gardist Rivalry.
The Ambivalent Reception of Futurism in France,
England and Russia

Thomas Hunkeler

On February 14th, 1887, two years before the opening of the1889 World Fair in Paris, the newspaper Le Temps published a manifesto hostile to the construction of one of the main sites of the fair: the Eiffel Tower. The declaration, signed by numerous artists, writers and journalists, and addressed to one of three general directors of thefair, Jean-Charles Alphand, called for the immediate cancellation of the construction plans in order to preserve the beauty of the city. Rather predictable in its reasoning, the statement nevertheless gives an accurate idea of how French artists and intellectuals thought at the time about the place that France and its capital, Paris, had in the world. "Without falling into the exaltation of chauvinism, we havethe right, the declaration said, to declare loud and clear that Paris is the city without rival in the world. "…" Italy, Germany and the Flanders, rightly proud of their artistic heritage, do not possess anything comparable to ours, and Paris attracts curiosity and admiration from all over the world". In the eyes of the signatories, the construction of what they thought of as a second Babel tower did indeed not only disfigure the city but put France's international reputation at stake: "If foreigners come to visit our fair, they will shout out with astonishment: 'What? The French have found this horrible thing to give us an idea about their famous taste?' They will be right to make fun of us "…"" (Sirinelli 1996: 31). Instead of being the sign of France's power, as the organizers of the World Fair would haveit, the signatories feared that the Eiffel Tower would be considered by the world as the unmistakable sign of the nation's artistic decay: not even

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Invention of Politics in the European Avant-Garde (1906-1940)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.