"Blood and Homeland": Eugenics and Racial Nationalism in Central and Southeast Europe, 1900-1940

By Marius Turda; Paul J. Weindling | Go to book overview

Taking Care of the National Body:
Eugenic Visions in Interwar Bulgaria,
1905–1940*

Christian Promitzer

In the 1942 issue of the German-Bulgarian Society Yearbook (DeutschBulgarische Gesellschaft), the Bulgarian zoologist Stefan Konsulov (1885–1954) contributed a piece on the "nature of the Bulgarian." One page was devoted to Bulgarian attitudes towards racial hygiene:

In the past, the selection of bride and groom was made by the aged,
by those who were well experienced "…". In its essence, the nature
of this responsibility was definitely racial hygienic. As in many cases
the Bulgarian people expressed their experience of the past in coarse
proverbs and popular sayings. To quote one of the many racial hygien-
ic proverbs: 'Take dogs and women from a good tribe!' The relatives
of the mate carefully investigate the tribe and the descent of the bride
and the groom: whether the members of the family are economically
active, quarrelsome, alcoholics or mentally disabled and so on; and
after having finished preparations for marriage, the women of the kin
of the groom accompany the bride to a bathing place, while the men of
the bride's kin accompany the groom in the same process. Therewith
each group should take a close look at the body of the future mate and
ascertain whether there are any defects, which may have been hidden
by clothing.1

Stefan Konsulov was well aware that he was writing for a German audience; he had come into contact with German racial hygiene during his stay at the University of Breslau in 1920.2 In Bulgaria, Konsulov hoped, the "preparation and execution of a programme of racial hygiene will meet fewer obstacles than in other countries," largely due to a strong eugenic tradition in the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, "the only church with racial hygiene laws."3 According to Konsulov, in 1871 in the statutes of the Exarchate, the autocephalous Bulgarian Church

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
"Blood and Homeland": Eugenics and Racial Nationalism in Central and Southeast Europe, 1900-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.