The Prague Spring 1968: A National Security Archive Documents Reader

By JaromÍr NavrÁtil | Go to book overview

DOCUMENT No. 49: Letter from Leonid Brezhnev to Alexander
Dubček Inviting a CPCz Delegation to the Warsaw Meeting, July 6,1968

Source: ÚSD, Archiv UV KSČ, F. 01, Sv. 210, A.j. 131.

This letter is one of several Brezhnev sent Dubček on July 5, 6, and 7 inviting him to come to Warsaw
for the meeting of communist party leaders. During a phone conversation on July 5, Dubček had asked
his Soviet counterpart to confirm in writing what the venue and purpose of the meeting would be; this brief
letter constitutes Brezhnev's response.

At a session of the CPCz CC Presidium on July 8, a substantial majority voted in support of Dubček's
view that the CPCz should refrain from sending a delegation to the Warsaw Meeting and should instead
continue to seek bilateral negotiations with each of the "fraternal" countries, including Romania and
Yugoslavia as well as the "Five."

(See Document No. 50.)

6 July 1968

To the First Secretary of the CPCz CC Comrade A. Dubček:

At the behest and urging of the Central Committees of the Bulgarian Communist Party, the Hungarian Socialist Workers' Party, the Socialist Unity Party of Germany, and the Polish United Workers' Party, we appeal to you with a proposal to attend a comradely meeting at the very highest level to discuss the situation that has emerged in the ČSSR.

As things look now, this meeting will be held either on Wednesday the 10th or on Thursday the 11th of July in Warsaw.

At the head of the delegations from the fraternal parties will be the highest-ranking officials. The precise composition of each delegation will be left to the respective CC to decide.

We hope that you will show full understanding for our proposal and that a delegation representing the CPCz will come to the conference of fraternal parties in Warsaw.

With communist regards

L Brezhnev

General Secretary, CPSU CC

-206-

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