The Prague Spring 1968: A National Security Archive Documents Reader

By JaromÍr NavrÁtil | Go to book overview

DOCUMENT No. 82: The CPSU Politburo's Instructions to Ambassador
Chervonenko for Meetings with Czechoslovak Leaders, August 13,1968

Source: APRF, Prot. No. 38.

These Soviet Politburo instructions direct Ambassador Stepan Chervonenko to meet First Secretary
Dubček again and reiterate the concerns expressed by Brezhnev in his telephone calls and by the CPSU
leadership in its collective note to the CPCz Presidium. A second set of instructions calls for a meeting
with President Svoboda, who. the Soviet leaders hoped, would influence "the course and outcome of
events "in "the necessary direction." Chervonenko's conversations with Svoboda were designed to ensure
that the ČSSR president would at least acquiesce in, and perhaps openly support, Soviet military
intervention. The ambassador's instructions do not, however, include a discussion of military plans,
suggesting that Soviet leaders remained uncertain about securing his active cooperation.

(See also Document No. 91.)

Proletarians of all countries, unite!

Communist Party of the Soviet Union, CENTRAL COMMITTEE

TOP SECRET

No. P94/101

To: Cdes. Brezhnev, Kirilenko, Andropov, Katushev, Ponomarev, Gromyko, and Rusakov.

Extract from protocol No. 94 of the session of the CPSU CC Politburo on 13 August 1968

On Instructions to the Soviet Ambassador in Prague

To affirm the instructions to the Soviet ambassador in Prague (see attached).

CC SECRETARY

Regarding point 101 of Prot. No. 94

SECRET

URGENT

IMMEDIATE ATTENTION

PRAGUE

SOVIET AMBASSADOR

Urgently call on Cdes. Dubček and Černík and, referring to the instructions of the CPSU CC Politburo and USSR government, tell them the following:

We have already drawn the attention of the CPCz leadership to a number of serious facts attesting to the blatant violation by the Czechoslovak side of the agreement achieved in Čierna

-357-

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