Resources for Student Assessment

By M. G. Kelly; Jon Haber | Go to book overview

ABOUT ISTE

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) is a nonprofit professional organization with a worldwide membership of leaders in education technology. We are dedicated to promoting appropriate uses of information technology to support and improve learning, teaching, and administration in PK-12 education and teacher education. As part of that mission, ISTE provides high-quality and timely information, services, and materials, such as this book.


ISTE's Seal of Alignment Program

As classrooms become more student centered and students become more tech savvy, educators must apply new strategies for both curriculum development and implementation and the assessment of learning outcomes. As the trusted source for information on education technology, ISTE believes in recognizing exemplary programs and products through its peer-reviewed ISTE Seal of Alignment Program (www.iste.org/nets/seal). This program recognizes curriculum and assessment resources that have successfully aligned themselves with one or more components of the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students, Teachers, and Administrators.

The NETS-aligned assessment resources outlined in this book can help school leaders identify assessment solutions that meet their state and local needs. Current assessment partners include Certiport (a sponsor of this book; www. certiport.com), International Computer Driving License (www.icdlus.com), Learning.com (www.learning.com/tla), Microsoft (www. iste.org/resources/asmt/msiste/), and PBS TeacherLine (http://www.pbs.org/teacherline/).


ISTE's Book Publishing Program

ISTE Book Publishing works with experienced educators to develop and produce classroomtested books and courseware. Every manuscript and product we select for publication is peer reviewed and professionally edited. We look for content that emphasizes the use of technology where it can make a difference—making the teacher's job easier; saving time; motivating students; helping students who have unique learning styles, abilities, or backgrounds; and creating learning environments that would be impossible without technology. We believe technology can improve the effectiveness of teaching while making learning exciting and fun. We value your feedback on this book and other ISTE products. E-mail us at books@iste.org.

ISTE thanks Certiport, SkillCheck, and Thomson Course Technology for their sponsorship of NETS'S: Resources for Student Assessment. Their support of this work and of ISTE's larger mission is deeply appreciated, and speaks highly of their commitment to advancing effective uses of technology in education.

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