Resources for Student Assessment

By M. G. Kelly; Jon Haber | Go to book overview

ABOUT THOMSON COURSE TECHNOLOGY

Thomson Course Technology is dedicated to helping people teach and learn with technology. As a proud sponsor of NETS.S: Resources for Student Assessment, its goals are aligned with ISTE's mission to provide [leadership and service to improve teaching and learning by advancing the effective use of technology in K-12 education and teacher education.]

Since 1989, Thomson Course Technology has published innovative texts and creative electronic learning solutions to help educators teach, students learn, and individuals expand their understanding of emergent and current technologies. Its goal is to produce dynamic products in all technology-related disciplines, as well as instructional resource materials and powerful technology-based assessment and learning solutions that surpass customer needs and expectations.

The No Child Left Behind Act is redefining Thomson Course Technology's mission in the K-12 world, just as it is challenging technology-using educators at every level to lend their expertise to the ongoing debate about exactly what [technology literacy] is and how it should be assessed. Thomson's market-leading software SAM (Skills Assessment Manager) is a testing and training tool that measures and reinforces Microsoft Office, Internet, Microsoft Windows, and other key technology concepts. Through SAM, districts can provide teachers with a customizable, flexible solution for training and assessing students' knowledge of and proficiency in basic technology skills and concepts. Districts can also use the tool to assess teachers' knowledge and skill in integrating technology into the classroom.

Over the years, Thomson Course Technology has evolved its own goals from supporting technology literacy efforts to enabling true technology fluency. Being literate means you can read; being fluent means you truly understand and can communicate. One lesson learned from developing products such as SAM is the value of courseware that looks on the surface like an assessment tool but in reality helps both teachers and students progressively refine and adjust how they teach and what they learn. Because no one has yet defined precisely the right way to reach all students and give them the basic technology skills they need, such midcourse corrections make teaching tools truly useful.

Thomson Course Technology is confident you will find the information provided in this book helpful in navigating the evolving educational landscape, and looks forward to an ongoing dialogue with you. To find out more about Thomson Course Technology, please visit www.course.com/school.

-vii-

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