Postcolonial Poetry in English

By Rajeev S. Patke | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the debts of gratitude accumulated in the course of writing this book: to Elleke Boehmer, for the invitation to join the project, and for her advice throughout the writing of the book; to Ruth Anderson for seeing it through its early stage; to Tom Perridge, Jacqueline Baker, and Christine Rode for seeing it through the press; to Matthew Brown for his care and attention to detail in preparing the final typescript; to the National University of Singapore for study leave during 2003; to its Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, for a research grant (R-103-000-042) during 2003–2004; to the staff of its Central Library, for their unfailing support in acquiring materials; and to the Department of English Language and Literature, for its support in countless ways, over many years.

Inevitably, a book that works its way across such vast terrains must build on the work of others. I am grateful to the numerous poets and readers of poetry whose writing has made mine possible. Several friends and colleagues—Walter Lim, Philip Holden, Gwee Li Sui, and John Whalen-Bridge—read the book in part; Susan Ang, Anjali Kadekodi, and Kirpal Singh read a draft in full. I am grateful to them for their comments and suggestions. The responsibility for all the sins of omission and commission inevitable to such an undertaking remains, ruefully, with me.

I am grateful to the following for permission to quote copyright material:

A. K. Mehrotra, for a quotation from 'Dream-figures in Sunlight', The Transfiguring Places (Delhi: Ravi Dayal Publishers, 1998);

Eavan Boland and Carcanet Press, for 'In Which Hester Bateman…', Code (Manchester: Carcanet Press, 2001);

Kamau Brathwaite and Oxford University Press, for quotations from The Arrivants: A New World Trilogy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973);

-ix-

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